Whose Business Is It Anyway?

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James Swan failure recovery coaching

For better or worse, I am fascinated with Tik Tok.

Like on other social media platforms, humor, education, wisdom, wit, and beauty appear alongside gross misinformation, rampant bigotry, racism, misogyny, homophobia, transphobia, and other dark elements that should make any reasonable human run for their life.

And yet, I open the app more times each day than I care to admit.
It is my new favorite train wreck from which often I cannot pry my eyes.

Opinions fly across the app’s pages like bats from a cave at sunset and are stated with conviction, passion, and vitriol; they appear almost believable at times.
Opinions on others’ opinions fill the comment pages, with the only real winner in the exchange being the app itself. It reminds me of a story illustrating another underrated superpower; the power of minding your own business.

A young child ran into their house in tears. After many anguishing minutes, their parents deciphered that a schoolyard incident was to blame.

Thinking they were funny, the child read aloud from a note passed by a classmate to a third friend. Not only were they called to the office, but they found themselves rebuffed by the note-passing students.

They were deeply hurt by this and confused by the cascade of emotions surrounding the whole incident. They had walked home in tears.

Taking the hand of their tearful child, one of the parents led the youngster out of the house and into the garage, where they rummaged for a moment before turning to face the sniffling child.

With two hula-hoops in hand, they offered one and began spinning the second around their waist. The invitation was grudgingly accepted, and soon both were focused on keeping the plastic hoops spinning around their waists.

Suddenly, the parents’ hoop dropped to the ground—the distraction causing the second hoop to find its place at the child’s feet.

Pointing to the small circle at their own feet, the parent observed that everything inside the ring was their business and everything outside the ring was not their business.

They picked up their hoop, stood it against the wall, and headed inside the house.

If you would like support to focus on your own business, an effective coaching relationship can help.

Complimentary Coaching Conversation

After a public shaming over a business mistake, I lost everything. Over the next four years, I fought my way back to hope, joy, and a vision for the future. Today, my mission is to help others who, just like me, had been knocked to the ground by personal or professional failure.

Each month, I create a handful of opportunities to show up for hurting individuals who are serious about radically changing their life. I provide judgment-free conversation that helps you stop feeling like a failure.

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